Premature Ejaculation – The Problem Men Don’t Talk About

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    Problem? What problem?

    Would your partner like sex to last longer? Do you really need to ask?

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is a big problem. Its definition varies from instant orgasm on vaginal contact, to ejaculation after a few minutes of movement after penetration. It is a problem for a man because he wants to satisfy his partner as well as himself, and it’s a problem for a woman who might need prolonged vaginal stimulation to reach orgasm.

    found that 29% of men aged between 19 and 59 reported a problem with premature ejaculation. Age was not a factor, and men of all ages were affected equally.

    PE Treatment Options

    You might not want to speak to your doctor, but you are best doing so because possible causes of premature ejaculation include low testosterone, prostate issues, high blood pressure, and depression.

    Your doctor will look for underlying reasons for your PE problem, and will probably advise you to use a topical spray rather than tablets. A spray is much safer because you are only applying it to your penis, rather than ingesting it and subjecting every part of your body to your medication.

    Sprays work by numbing your penis to a small extent. You can experiment with the amount you use until you find the optimum dosage that prolongs your time to ejaculation without removing all sensation.

    Are Penis Sprays Safe?

    Are you concerned about the side-effects of taking oral medications to help you last longer? Every medication has unwanted effects and taking tablets for a localized problem subjects every organ in your body to the drug you are taking.

    Delay sprays like Promescent as a local anesthetic. Lidocaine has been used by dentists for years and has been approved by the FDA, including for use with pregnant women. It works by numbing the surface area and penile skin by more than 40% in some cases.

    If a man ensures that the spray has dried and been absorbed by the penile skin before sexual contact, then transfer to his partner will not be a problem.

    Treatment Options for Premature Ejaculation

    There are many scientific studies that have looked at delay sprays

    Dr. Christopher Asandra, chief medical officer with  lists a number of options including:

    • Medications
    • De-sensitizers
    • Circumcision
    • Weight Loss

    Medications such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as Prozac sometimes help men with PE issues, but they have side-effects that include drowsiness, decreased libido, and erectile dysfunction, so they are not Dr. Asandra’s first choice.

    De-sensitizers work by the man spraying the product onto his penis before intercourse. Many de-sensitizers on the market have an unfortunate effect: They transfer to the female partner, making her vagina and vulva less sensitive. Dr. Asandra does recommend one de-sensitizing spray, Promescent because it absorbs totally into the penis, so no transference occurs.

    Adult circumcision is an extreme and irreversible option. If a man’s foreskin is removed he will be less sensitive and probably have a prolonged intra-vaginal latency time (IVLT), the time between vaginal penetration and ejaculation. However, there may be complications with adult circumcision and many men will be reluctant to undergo the procedure except as a last resort.

    Weight Loss addresses some of the causes of erectile dysfunction; high blood pressure, diabetes, and obesity. If you are overweight, this is another reason to reduce your body mass index (BMI). It is safe and has no unwanted side-effects, so it is something every man should aim for in addition to any other PE treatment.

    Further Scientific Studies

    A 2016 , “Event-level impact of Promescent on quality of sexual experience in men with subjective premature ejaculation.” The average time between vaginal penetration and ejaculation of the men in this study was 6.5 minutes, well above the clinical definition of premature ejaculation (PE). However, the men identified themselves as suffering from PE.

    The average estimated ejaculatory latency time was 11.16 min during sexual events when the product was used and 6.81 min during sexual events when the product was not used; this was a statistically significant difference (P<0.001). When the product was used, 65.6% of sexual events resulted in both members of the couple having an orgasm, compared with 44.1% when the product was not used.

    A 2017 study looked at the effect of Promescent on a group of men for whom other PE treatments had been ineffective. The study found that men chose to continue to use Promescent, even six months later, indicating satisfaction with its results.